Crochet Terms

Published May 15, 2016 by estherknit

Yarn 1

 

Back Loop (Bl;bl)

The back loop is the loop away from you at the top of the stitch.  At the top of your stitch you will see two loops which look like a V.   Instead of inserting the hook under the top two loops, insert the hook into the back loop only.

Back Post (BP; bp)

Back post stitches appear to recede on the side of the crocheted fabric that is facing you.

Back Post Double Crochet (BPdc; bpdc)

Yarn over (yo) and insert hook from the back to the front around the post of the double crochet (dc) on the previous row. Complete as for a regular double crochet.

Basic Mesh

This is created by skipping stitches to create an open weave fabric.

Bobble Stitch (Bo; bo)

In crochet you can create a bobble stitch by working several stitches in the same place and joining them together at the top, often on a background of shorter stitches.

Both Loops

Most crochet stitches are worked under both loops of the stitch.  At the top of your stitch you will see two loops which look like a V.  Insert the hook into both loops.

Broomstick Crochet

Broomstick crochet is a particular type of crochet worked with both a crochet hook and a ‘broomstick’ such as a large knitting needle.

Chain Space (ch-space)

This is a space previously made.  A chain space occurs when you work a chain stitch, then skip a stitch, and then work into the next stitch.  In the next row, you can work stitches into this chain space.

Chain Stitch (CH; ch)

The chain stitch is the basis for all crochet.  Start with a slip knot.  Hook through loop, wrap the yarn over the hook, and draw the yarn through to form a new loop.

Chart

In crochet, the pattern may be shown by a diagram or chart.  Crochet diagrams are a visual representation of the crochet stitches used.  The diagram will also give you a good idea of what the finished garment will look like. The diagram will have a stitch key.The stitch key will show you what each stitch looks like in its drawn form.  Each symbol in the key represents a stitch in the chart.

Chart Symbols or Notation

A crochet pattern can be in words or in chart form, or both.  Crochet charts and symbols are a universal language that allow an alternative way of reading patterns.  A chart will include a stitch key.   Each symbol in the key represents a stitch in the chart as it looks on the right side of the work.  Standardized crochet symbols have been adopted by the Craft Yarn Council.

Cluster Stitch (Cl; cl)

To work a cluster stitch several stitches are worked together at the top.  It is a group of crochet stitches that are worked together in the same loop and then joined together at the top to create a triangle.

Crochet

Crochet is a continuous thread worked into a fabric of interlocking loops with the aid of a hook or the act of working such a fabric.   The yarn is made up into a textured fabric by means of a hooked needle called a crochet hook.

Crochet Edging

A crochet edging is a decorative crochet rows worked along the edge of a main piece.

Crochet Hook

The crochet hook is the tool used for most crochet work.  It is a slim shaft of metal, wood or plastic with a hook at one end.  Crochet hooks are available in many sizes to suit different types of yarn.  With different hooks you can make your stitches larger or smaller.

Diagram

See – Chart

Double Crochet Two Together (dc2tog)

This technique is used to create decreases in crochet.  To decrease in crochet is to eliminate one or more stitches.  You can decrease more stitches, such as double crochet three together (dc3tog) and double crochet four together (dc4tog).

Fan Stitch

To work fan stitch several stitches are worked into the same place and joined at the base to make a fan or shell shape.

Fasten off (Fo; fo)

This finished your crochet piece securing the yarn so that your crochet will not unravel.  To fasten off, cut the yarn, leaving a tail, and pull the yarn through the final loop on your hook.

Filet Crochet

In filet crochet, filled blocks create the design whilst open spaces form the background.  Blocks consist of three double crochets worked into the stitches or spaces of the previous row.  You can work filet crochet patterns from a crochet chart.

Forward Pass (FwdP)

This is a Tunisian crochet term.  Each Tunisian crochet row is worked in two stages: the forward pass (FwdP) and the return pass (RetP). In the forward pass loops are picked onto the hook from the row below and in the return pass they are worked off the hook.

Foundation Chain

The foundation chain is a chain (or series of chains) made at the beginning of a piece of crochet. The stitches of the first row are worked into this chain (or chains).

Foundation Double Crochet

This creates a foundation row for you to work from.  Start by chaining four stitches. Then insert the hook into the fourth stitch. Yarn over and pull up a loop. Yarn over again and draw up another loop. Three loops on the hook.  Yarn over once more and draw the yarn through one loop on the hook. Yarn over and draw through two loops on the hook. Yarn over and draw through the two loops on the hook again to complete one foundation double crochet stitch.

Foundation Row

To start any crochet piece, you will need to set up your work and create a base or foundation row.

Front Loop (FL; fl)

The front loop is the loop towards you at the top of the stitch.  At the top of your stitch you will see two loops which look like a V.   Instead of inserting the hook under the top two loops, insert the hook into the front loop only.

Front Post (FP; fp)

Front post stitches are raised crochet stitches on the surface of the fabric facing you.

Front Post Double Crochet (FPdc; fpdc)

Yarn over (yo) and insert hook from the front to the back around the post of the double crochet (dc) on the previous row. Complete as for a regular double crochet.

Granny Square

A granny square is a crocheted motif that can be created in infinity possible variations and colours.  It is worked by crocheting a ring of chain stitches that form the centre and then crocheting a series of round that work out from the centre.

Gauge

Gauge (tension) refers to how lose or tight you crochet your stitches.  Some patterns list measurements for a certain number of stitches and/or rows. Crochet a sample swatch and adjust your hook size if required.

Hairpin Lace

This is a lace technique where a crochet hook and a small hairpin lace loom are used.   The loom consists of two parallel metal rods held at the top and the bottom by removeable bars.  The lace is formed by wrapping the yarn around the prongs of the hairpin lace loom to form loops which are held together by a row of crochet stitches worked in the centre, called the spine.  Later, the bottom bar of the hairpin is removed and the loops at slipped off the end.  This produces strips which can be joined together to create the lace fabric.

Hook

See – Crochet Hook

International Size Range (ISR)

Crochet hooks are standardised into an international size range or ISR.

Join

Join two stitches together, usually done by working a slip stitch in the top of the next stitch.

Lace Pattern

A lace pattern is a stitch pattern forming an openwork design.

Loop Stitch (lp.st.)

Loop stitch is a variation of single crochet (sc) and is worked on the wrong-side rows because the loops form at the back of the crochet fabric.

Mesh Pattern

A mesh pattern is a stitch pattern forming a regular geometric grid.

Motif

A motif is a small single crochet block.  These blocks or motifs are then stitched together to form bigger items. The most well known motif is the granny square.

Overlaid Stitches

Crochet chains worked on top of a crochet mesh background.

Post

The post is the vertical part of the stitch. You can crochet into the back post or the front post.  You work your stitch in the usual way, with the exception of where you place the hook.  Instead of inserting the hook under the top two loops, insert the hook into the front or back loop only.

Puff Stitch

Several stitches, often half trebles or trebles. worked in the same place, and joined together at the top.

Raised Stitches

Stitches formed by inserting the hook around the stem of a stitch below the normal position.

Relief Stitches

See – Raised Stitches

Return Pass (RetP)

This is a Tunisian crochet term.  Each Tunisian crochet row is worked in two stages: the forward pass (FwdP) and the return pass (RetP). In the forward pass loops are picked onto the hook from the row below and in the return pass they are worked off the hook.

Return Pass Decrease

This is a Tunisian crochet term.  The decrease is made in the return pass of the row.  When working a return pass, you normally close your stitches by yarning over and pulling through two loops across the row. However, when you need to decrease stitches in the return pass, you will pull through more than two loops.

Reverse Single Crochet (rsc)

This stitch is worked from left to right.  Insert crochet hook at an edge stitch and pull up loop, yarn over, and draw this loop through the first one.  Now, insert hook in next stitch to the right, pull up loop, yarn over, and draw through both loops on hook.

Shell Stitch

See – Fan Stitch

Single Crochet (sc)

Single crochet is the most basic of all crochet stitches. All the other crochet stitches are variations of this stitch.

Single Crochet Two Together (sc2tog)

This technique is used to create decreases in crochet.  To decrease in crochet is to eliminate one or more stitches.  You can decrease more stitches, such as single crochet three together (sc3tog) and single crochet four together (sc4tog).  Insert hook into stitch and draw up a loop. Insert hook into next stitch and draw up a loop. Yarn over, draw through all three loops on hook. One single crochet two together is completed.

Slip Stitch (ss)

The slip stitch is the smallest of all of the crochet stitches.  Insert the hook into the work as indicated, wrap the yarn over the hook, and draw the yarn through the work plus the loop on the hook in one movement.  You can use the slip stitch to make a seam, shape your work, or for other decorative techniques.

Spike Stitch

A stitch worked by inserting from the front to the back, one or more rows below the normal position and (or) to the right or left.

Symbols

Crochet symbols are used in some crochet patterns.  The motif or lace pattern will be represented by a chart with crochet symbols. Each stitch has a unique symbol and this is used to show how a design is created.   A crochet pattern may have a written pattern and a chart.   Crochet symbols are recognised by crocheters all over the world.

Tension

Tension (or gauge) refers to how lose or tight you crochet your stitches.  Some patterns list measurements for a certain number of stitches and/or rows. Crochet a sample swatch and adjust your hook size if required.

Tricot Needle

See – Tunisian Hook

Tunisian Crochet (TC; tc)

Tunisian crochet is a special type of crochet worked back and forth without turning the work.  On each forward row a series of loops is made and kept on the hook, then on each return row each stitch is completed in turn.   A special Tunisian crochet hook is required.  You start with a base row.  Each row is a two step process – forward pass and reverse pass.  The work is always facing you.   It is a hybrid technique of regular crocheting and knitting.  It is also known as Afghan knitting.  It produces a firm and inelastic textured fabric.

Tunisian Hook

A Tunisian hook is much longer than a traditional crochet hook.  They have a cylindrical shaft and a knob at the end and come in a wide range of sizes.

Tunisian Simple Stitch (Tss)

This is the basic stitch in Tunisian crochet.  Insert hook from right to left under the front vertical bar of the next stitch.  Yarn over and pull up a loop. Leave the loop on the hook.  When working the return pass, close your stitches by yarning over and pulling through two loops across the row.

Turn (T; t)

Turn your work so that you can work back for the next row.

Turning Chain (t-chain)

Crochet one or more chain stitches after you have turned your work before your begin your next row.  The purpose of the turning chain is to bring your yarn to the height necessary in order to work the first stitch of your next row or round.  The number of chains depends on the height of the next stitch.  The turning chain can be worked before or after turning your work.  For example, single crochet has one turning chain, half double crochet has two turning chains, double crochet has three turning chains, and treble (triple) crochet has four turning chains.  The turning chain at the beginning of the row can take the place of the first stitch.

Yarn Over (yo) or Yarn Round Hook (yrh)

Wrapping the yarn over your crochet hook is the most basic step to every stitch in crochet.  Yarn overs can be done before or after you insert the hook into the next stitch.  You can yarn over once or more times depending on the stitch.

 

US and UK Crochet Terms

The US and the UK have different names for crochet stitches which can be confusing. They use the same terms to describe different stitches.

US – Single Crochet (sc) UK – Double Crochet (dc)

Insert the hook into the work, yarn over the hook and draw the yarn through the work only, yarn over hook draw the yarn through both loops on the hook.

US – Half Double Crochet (hdc) UK – Half Treble (htr)

Wrap yarn over hook and insert the hook into the work, yarn over the hook draw through work. Wrap yarn over hook and draw through all 3 loops in the hook.

US – Double Crochet (dc) UK – Treble (tr)

Wrap yarn over hook and insert the hook into the work, yarn over the hook draw through work. Wrap yarn over hook draw through first 2 loops, then yarn over hook, draw through last two loops.

US – Treble (tr) UK – Double Treble (dtr)

Wrap the yarn over the hook twice and insert the hook into the work, yarn over hook draw through work. Wrap the yarn over hook, draw through first two loops, yarn over hook draw through next two loops, yarn over hook draw through last two loops.

Yarn 2
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