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All posts for the month December, 2015

Free Pattern – Buttons Headband

Published December 31, 2015 by estherknit

Baby Headband 6

Measurements

To fit baby

Width round head: 32.5 cm (13 inches)

Materials

Robin Double Knit

Shade: 019 Blush

Robin Double Knit Print

Shade: 189 Carnival

10 g for one headband

One Button for embellishment

A pair of 4 mm (US 6) knitting needles

One button

Tension / Gauge

18 sts and 30 rows to 10 cm (4 inches)

measured over garter stitch using 4 mm needles

To knit headband

Using 4 mm US 6) needles and Blush, cast on 60 sts loosely.

Continue in garter stitch, every row knit, throughout.

Using Blush, knit 2 rows.

Using Carnival, knit 4 rows.

Using Blush, knit 2 rows.

Cast off loosely.

To make up / Finishing

Sew the two short ends of headband together.  Sew button over seam.

Weave in ends.

Baby Headband 7

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How to Work Duplicate Stitch

Published December 26, 2015 by estherknit

Duplicate Stitch is also called Swiss Darning. It is a type of embroidery which can replace Fair Isle knitting.  Duplicate stitch is a quick and simple method to apply motifs onto a finished garment, covering over the knitted fabric with a yarn of another colour.  The shape embroidered looks just like Fair Isle.  So, duplicate stitch is a simple and yet effective way of decorating garments after they have been knitted.

The design is embroidered after you have finished knitting.  It can be decorative or you can use duplicate stitch to cover knitting mistakes and weak spots. It was traditionally used to darn socks.  Knitting is an ideal base for embroidery, the vertical and horizontal lines acting as a guide for added decoration.  One stitch in duplicate stitch copies the exact outline of the knitted stitch beneath it and can be used for the addition of motifs that were intended to be knitted in. It is an embroidery technique where the embroidery yarn duplicates the knitted stitch.

letter D chart 2

It is worked row by row and stitch by stitch following a chart.  Naturally, this method is impractical for large areas of colour which are best knitted using the Intarsia method, also called picture knitting.  However, where small areas are involved it is an extremely useful adjunct to knitting.  Besides being added to plain work, duplicate stitch may also be used to introduce additional colours to Fair Isle or Intarsia work where it is not desirable to add them during the knitting stage.

Duplicate stitch should be worked with a blunt tapestry needle to avoid splitting the knitted stitches.  Use a yarn that is the same weight as that used for the knitting as a finer one will not cover the original stitch properly and a heavier one will give the work a raised or buckled appearance.  Follow the line of the stitches, keeping the tension of the embroidery stitch exactly the same as that of the knitting.

Work on a plain stockinette stitch base.  Thread a tapestry needle with yarn of same thickness of the one used for the garment.  Use a different coloured yarn to embroider.

DuplicateStitch 1

First Row

Begin at the top right of the motif.  Bring up the needle to right side of work through stitch below 1st stitch to be worked.  **  Insert needle at right of stitch just above.  Bring it up again on the left of this stitch.

DuplicateStitch 2

Insert needle in stitch below, where it first emerged. Bring up needle in next stitch to the left. **

DuplicateStitch 3

Repeat from ** to ** as many times as required.

2nd Row

After last stitch bring up needle through stitch below – not through left stitch.

DuplicateStitch 4

Turn the work.  Work from right to left as follows:  Insert needle at bottom right of stitch below and bring it up again at left of same stitch.  Insert needle through stitch above i.e. where it emerged to begin this 2nd row. After last stitch of 2nd row, bring up needle through stitch above and turn work.

letter D sample 2

Continue repeating 1st and 2nd rows. To work on a vertical line, begin at top of motif.  Make 1 stitch and bring up needle for next stitch through stitch below.  Repeat until the motif is complete.

Free Pattern – Serenity Scarf

Published December 21, 2015 by estherknit

Serenity Scarf 6

Measurements

To fit: child (adult)

Length: 100 (165) cm, 39½ (65½) inches

Materials

B & M Serenity Chunky

Shade: Claret, 150 (200) g

A pair 7 mm (US 10½) knitting needles

Tension / Gauge

10 sts to and 17 rows to 10 cm (4 inches)

measured over garter stitch using 7 mm needles

Pattern notes

For a neater edge, always slip the first stitch of every row

To knit scarf

Using 7 mm (US 10½) needles, cast on 18 (20) sts loosely.

1st row: Knit.

This row forms the pattern and is repeated.  Continue in pattern as set until scarf measures 165 cm or 65½ inches or until most of the yarn has been used up.  Cast off loosely in pattern.

To make up/ Finishing

Join cast on and cast off edges together to form a circle. Weave in ends.  Pin out to size, cover with a damp cloth, and leave to dry overnight.

Serenity Scarf 7

How to Add Embroidery

Published December 17, 2015 by estherknit

An effective way to add interest to a simple knitted garment is to add embroidery.

Embroidery 1Chain Stitch

Chain stitch is particularly effective as horizontal and vertical lines dividing the background into large check patterns. Tack lines of stitches onto the background to form a guide for the embroidery.  Thread a needle with yarn and secure to back of work at lower edge of marked vertical line.  Bring needle from back to front through centre of first stitch and pull yarn through.  Form the yarn into a wide circle above the line of stitching.  Hold the yarn with your left thumb; re-insert the needle through the centre of the first stitch and out again through the centre of the corresponding stitch three (or more) rows above.  Keep at a relaxed tension so that it does not pucker the knitted background.  Repeat the process of making chains over every three (or more) rows until the line of embroidery is as long as you require.  Insert the needle from front to back immediately above the last stitch worked and fasten off on back of work.

To embroider horizontal lines, turn work so that side edge of background becomes the lower edge.  Secure yarn to back of work at lower edge of marked line.  Bring needle from back to front between first and second stitches.  Form the yarn into a wide circle above the line of stitching and hold yarn down with your left thumb.  Re-insert the needle between the first and second stitches and out again after the third stitch.  Make chains over every two (or more) stitches until you are finished you line.  Fasten off on the wrong side.

Single French Knot

Single French Knot 1

To embroider a single French knot, bring up the needle to the right side of the work.  Make a loop with the thread and hold it with the left hand.  Slip the needle through the loop, pull thread to tighten loop around needle and insert needle close to the point where it first emerged.  Bring the needle up again in position for the next stitch.

French Knot

French Knot 1

To embroider a French knot, bring up the needle to the right side and work one short running stitch.  Do not pull out the needle.  Wind thread 2 or 3 times around end of needle, hold loops with left hand and pull needle through tightening loops slightly.  Insert the needle again close to where the thread first came out.

Lazy Daisy Stitch

Lazy Daisy Stitch 1

The lazy daisy stitch is often used to embroider petals.  Bring out needle at base of a petal, shape loop with thread and hold it with left thumb.  Insert needle at the right of where it first emerged.  Bring up needle at point corresponding to top of petal and inside loop.  Insert needle behind loop to hold petal in position and bring it up again at base of following petal.

Satin Stitch

Satin Stitch 1

To embroider the satin stitch, bring up needle to the right side of work at the top left of the shape.  Insert needle at the right of the shape.  Bring the needle through again just below the starting point of the first stitch.  Continue working stitches close to each other so as to cover the shape completely.

Cross Stitch

Each cross in the cross stitch covers a square section of background fabric.  Each square has slightly more rows than stitches.  The position of the needle as you work is important.  Always insert it to the side of the stitches over which you are working.  If you insert the needle through the centre of a stitch, the natural elasticity of the knitting pulls the embroidery out of shape.  Mark the perimeter of area to be embroidered with pins inserted after every four rows and between every three stitches.  Then, using needle threaded with sewing cotton, tack lines of stitching onto the background to form a grid of squares.  Each square will eventually have a cross covering it.

Thread a wool needle with your chosen yarn.  Secure yarn to back of fabric.  Bring needle from back to front at side of first marked stitch at lower right hand corner of first box.  Working from right to left, re-insert needle from front to back after third stitch four rows above – at corner of box diagonally opposite where yarn is joined.  Bring needle to front again at lower right hand corner of next box to the left, making sure that you always insert the needle between stitches.

Continue in this way, working one diagonal line of each cross, until you reach the end of the first line of pattern.  Finish with the yarn at the lower left hand corner of the last box.  Work from the left to right and re-insert the needle from front to back at corner of box diagonally opposite – one cross stitch is complete.  Bring the needle to the front again at lower left hand corner of next box to the right.  Repeat until line of crosses is complete.

Embroidery 1

Free Pattern – Beanie in Pink

Published December 16, 2015 by estherknit

Beanie in Pink 6

Measurements

To fit size: newborn (3 months: 6-9 months: 12 months)

Head circumference: 30 (34: 38: 42) cm, 12 (13½: 15: 16½) inches

Materials

Twilight double knitting

Shade: 991-7 pink glitter, 50 g

A pair of 4 mm (US 6) knitting needles

A pair of 4½ mm (US 7) knitting needles

Tension / Gauge

18 sts and 25 rows to 10 cm (4 inches)

measured over stockinette stitch using 4½ mm needles

To knit hat

Using 4 mm (US 6) needles and yarn used double throughout,

cast on 54 (60: 68: 76) sts and work 4 rows in st.st.

Change to 4½ mm (US 7) needles and work 5½ (6¼: 7: 8) cm or 14 (16: 18 20) rows in st.st.

Shape Crown:

Now decrease as follows.

1st decrease row: * K8, k2tog; repeat from * to last 4 (0: 8: 0) sts, k4 (0: 8: 0).  49 (54: 62: 69) sts

Work 3 rows in stocking stitch.

2nd decrease row: * K7, k2tog; repeat from * to last 4 (0: 8: 4) sts, k4 (0: 8: 4).  44 (48: 56: 62) sts

Work 3 rows in stocking stitch.

3rd decrease row: * K6, k2tog; repeat from * to last 4 (0: 0: 4) sts, k4 (0: 0: 4).  39 (42: 49: 55) sts

Work 1 row in stocking stitch.

4th decrease row: * K5, k2tog; repeat from * to last 4 (0: 0: 4) sts, k4 (0: 0: 4).  34 (36: 42: 48) sts

Purl 1 row.

5th decrease row: * K4, k2tog; repeat from * to last 4 (0: 0: 4) sts, k4 (0: 0: 4).  29 (30: 35: 40) sts

Purl 1 row.

6th decrease row: * K3, k2tog; repeat from * to last 4 (0: 0: 4) sts, k4 (0: 0: 4).  24 (24: 28: 32) sts

Purl 1 row.

7th decrease row: * K2, k2tog; repeat from * to last 0 (0: 0: 4) sts, k0 (0: 0: 4).  18 (18: 21: 24) sts

Purl 1 row.

8th decrease row: K2tog across row to last to last 0 (0: 1: 4) sts, k0 (0: 1: 4).  9 (9: 11: 12) sts

Purl 1 row.

9th decrease row: K2tog across row to last to last 1 (1: 1: 4) sts, k1 (1: 1: 4).  5 (5: 6: 6) sts

Leave length of yarn and break yarn.

With the wrong side of the work facing you, thread yarn through the remaining stitches, pull up and sew to secure.

To make up / Finishing

Sew the back seam.  Roll brim to required length and catch down at back to secure the brim into position.  Weave in ends.

Beanie in Pink 7

How to Make a Pom-Pom

Published December 6, 2015 by estherknit

PomPom13A pom-pom (also spelt pom-pon) is a loose, fluffy, decorative ball or tuft of fibrous material. Pom-pons may come in many colours, sizes, and varieties. Pom-pons are shaken by cheerleaders and sports fans during spectator sports. Pom-pon is derived from the French word pompon, which refers to a small decorative ball made of fabric or feathers.

How to make Pom-Poms

Decide the size of the pom-pom you want.  You can use a pom-pom maker.

PomPom15.png

However, if you don’t have a pom-pom maker, then you can make your own. Cut two circles of card. The diameter should be slightly larger than the size of the finished pom-pom.  Cut a smaller hole in the centre of each circle about half the size of the original diameter. The larger this hole, the firmer the pom-pom will be.

Pompom7

Hold the two circles together and wind the yarn around the ring using several strands at a time until the ring is completely covered.

PomPom6

As the hole in the centre gets smaller, use a sewing needle to pass the yarn through the hole.

PomPom9.png

When finished, cut all around the yarn at the outside edge, between the two circles.  Make sure all the yarn has been cut.  Separate the two circles about 1 inch, but be careful – do not remove the circles yet. Now, wrap a length of yarn around the middle and tie firmly in a knot, leaving sufficient length for sewing the pom-pom in place.

PomPom10

Pull off the two circles carefully.  Use this length of yarn to create a circle for hanging up or attaching to your hat.  Trim the pom-pom.

PomPom14.png

 

 

 

 

 

Free Pattern – One and One Scarf

Published December 2, 2015 by estherknit

One and One Scarf 6

Measurements

To fit: child (adult)

Length: 120 (180) cm, 47½ (71½) inches

Materials

Robin Picasso Chunky

Shade: 2875 Parma Violet, 200 g

A pair 6½ mm (US 10½) knitting needles

Tension /  Gauge

17 sts and 15 rows to 10 cm (4 inches)

measured over rib pattern using 6½ mm needles

Pattern note

For a neater edge, always slip the first stitch of every row.

To knit scarf

Using 6½ mm (US 10½) needles, cast on 21 (25) sts.

Work in simple rib pattern as follows.

1st row: K1, * p1, k1; repeat from * to end.

2nd row: P1, * k1, p1; repeat from * to end.

Continue in pattern as set until scarf measures 120 (180) cm, 47½ (71½) inches long. Cast off loosely in pattern.

To make up / Finishing

Weave in ends.  Pin out to size, cover with a damp cloth, and leave to dry overnight.

Fringe (Optional)

Cut a number of lengths for one tassel, slightly more than twice the length of the finished tassel.  Fold the strands in half and draw the folded end through the edge of the knitted fabric using a crochet hook.  Pull the loose ends of yarn firmly through the loop to form a knot.  Trim all the ends once fringe is completed. The number of strands in each tassel decides the thickness of the fringe and the distance between each tassel.

One and One Scarf 7